Upcoming Courses

Coming in Spring 2018

 
0400 ENGFLM Introduction to Film
This is a basic course on the visual arts that offers the student a broad introduction to the medium of film. As part of this overview, the class will consider such issues as: the process of contemporary film production and distribution; the nature of basic film forms; selected approaches to film criticism; comparisons between film and the other media.
Prerequisites: None
Category:
 
0401 ENGFLM Introduction to Visual Culture
Introduction to Visual Culture develops skills to interpret visual culture in contemporary life. Using a wide variety of media, including film, television, advertisements, fashion magazines, museum exhibits, comic books, painting, graffiti, video games, the web, and photography, the course focuses on understanding how conceptions of visuality, gender, race, and politics shape not only definitions of high and low culture but also questions of knowledge and being. The class aims to find connections amongst all elements of culture, often positioning the students as the active analysts of everyday visual objects.
Instructor: Jedd Hakimi
Time: Monday 6pm - 9:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:
 
0532 ENGFLM Introduction to Film Genres
This course surveys major film genres--the Western, the musical, the detective film, the screwball comedy, etc. We will trace the history of film genres from the studio era to the present, including European transformations. The course seeks to relate film genres to the culture that created them.
Instructor: Julie Nakama
Time: Monday 9am - 12:50pm
Prerequisites: None.
Category: II
 
0540 ENGFLM World Film History
This course both introduces students to techniques of film analysis and acquaints them with major works and movements in international cinema.  The course pays particular attention to the evolution of film narrative and visual style and landmarks in film development--European avant-garde films, the British documentary, the classic Hollywood film, etc.
Instructor: Mark Best
Time: Wednesday 1pm - 4:50pm
Prerequisites: None. Recitation is required.
Category: Core Requirement
 
0570 ENGFLM Introduction to New Media
Over the past two decades, so-called "new media" -- ranging from television, computers, digital image production, video games, to the internet -- have begun to supplant the social and cultural prominence of film and other traditional media. This course will provide an introduction to a critical approach to new media. We'll look at how these media work: at the history and theory of their development, at the changes they have brought about in a broader media culture, and at their social status and significance (e.g., The place they occupy in culture, the kinds of interactions they make possible).
Instructor: Jinying Li
Time: Tuesday 1pm - 4:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category: II
 
0590 ENGFLM Filmmaking: Production and Criticism
Filmmaking: Production and Criticism introduces students to motion picture production through a critical and historical lens. Students in this class will produce short film projects and exercises that put film studies and filmmaking into dialogue. In addition to production assignments, students study the key aspects of film form, including production design, digital cinematography, sound recording and design, and digital video editing.
Instructor: Idrissou Mora-Kpai
Time: Tuesday 6pm - 9:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Note: A course fee will be applied to all production courses.
Category: Nonmajors are welcomed; this is a foundational course for the Film and Media Production Track
 
1410 ENGFLM Bollywood and Indian Cinema
This course will offer an overview of various Indian cinema traditions in their historical, aesthetic, and cultural contexts.  Students will learn how to analyze Indian films from the 1920s to the present in terms of formal techniques, narrative conventions, and viewing contexts and also in terms of broader historical contexts such as colonialism and the independence movement.  The history and formal conventions of Mainstream Bombay Cinema will be counterpointed with other kinds of Indian film.
Instructor: Neepa Majumdar
Time: Wednesday 9am - 12:50pm
Recitation: Friday 11am - 12pm
Category: I
 
1470 ENGFLM Film Directors: Spike Lee
This course looks at the mode of production of films and works to understand the contributions of directors, producers and screenwriters.  It will also consider less personal forces -- social climate, studio style, genre and audience taste.  It will, finally, examine the films of particular directors for signs of personal style, theme or preoccupation.  This semester will focus on the films of Spike Lee.
Instructor: Kevin Flanagan
Time: Thursday 6pm - 9:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  I
 
1471 ENGFLM Orson Welles
This course considers the screen career of Orson Welles. In considering his films, the course explores the evolution of Welles' cinematic style; the thematic concerns of his work; the ideological implications of his fictional universe; and his contribution to the development of American narrative cinema.
Instructor: Alison Patterson
Time: Monday 1pm - 4:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  I
 
1480 ENGFLM Topics in Film: Creative Production Workshop
Explores selected issues in the production and reception of film.
Instructor: Idrissou Mora-Kpai
Time: Thursday 9am - 12:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  II
 
1485 ENGFLM Film and Politics
This course examines film production, economics and forms of representation as reflections of political attitudes.  We will study a variety of narrative and non-fiction films which reveal differing political points of view, ranging from those that legitimize the dominant culture to those which criticize, if not challenge, dominant attitudes.  We will screen European, U.S., Soviet and third world cinema.
Instructor: Dana Och
Time: Wednesday 6pm - 9:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  II
 
1699 ENGFLM Science Fiction Film
This course examines the development of science fiction as a cinematic form, its relationship to genres such as horror and melodrama, its structure, images and style. We attempt to trace linkages between the films and social, political, scientific and aesthetic attitudes within the culture.
Instructor: Ellen Bishop
Time: Thursday 1pm - 4:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  II
 

1752 ENGFLM Television Analysis

This course increases students' awareness of television as a visual medium and as a cultural force by examining the forms television programming takes and the way these structures influence viewer response.  We will examine specific television genres and move through the fictional forms television takes (sitcoms, cop shows, serials, etc.) To "quality" forms of television.
Instructor: Dana Och
Time: Tuesday 9am - 12:50pm
Prerequisites: None
Category:  II
 
1920 ENGFLM Advanced Seminar in Film Studies
This capstone course designed for senior Film Studies majors focuses on concepts central to current theoretical discourse in the field.  Demanding, critically complex readings in film theory and film history will open up our discussion of such questions, and students will pose (and answer) questions of their own in essays, presentations, and weekly journals.  The course is designed for film majors and acn only be taken when all other requirements for the major are satisfied.
Instructor: Mark Lynn Anderson
Time: Wednesday 6pm - 9:50pm
Prerequisites: Department Consent Required
Category: Core Requirement

0001 FLMST Motion Picture Fundamentals
This hands-on course introduces students to key photographic concepts and the basics of shooting and editing film and digital video. It begins with a brief review of the Macintosh Operating System and some of its possibilities. (Students who are unfamiliar with Macs or with computers, in general, may opt to take 'Introduction to Digital' prior to this course.) Students will then work with 35mm still cameras while studying photographic exposure and composition, super-8 motion picture cameras while making short film and mini-dv cameras as they create short video projects. Both film and video editing will be done in a non-linear digital environment. Students will deal with issues such as composition, image sequencing, camera movement, continuity, editing, and time/space manipulation. Instruction will cover the use of equipment and technical basics, but lecturing is kept to a minimum. Basic terms, the development of a visual language and creative possibilities are stressed. All equipment is provided. A limited amount of film and processing is also provided, but students pay for their own videotape and other expenses. Grading is based on student projects as well as written exams. In addition to tuition a $70 course fee will be charged. Must be a School of Arts and Sciences or College of General Studies student to enroll.
Category: III; Core requirement
 
0601 FILMST Video Production I
This course is intended for freshmen and sophomore students, who have taken the introductory course, photographic and motion principles. This is an intermediate course in a new video production curriculum designed to optimize the ways in which students' knowledge and skills reflect changes in the field. For students who pursue video, video production 1 is an intermediate level course similar to video production. Students will edit video on computer workstations using final cut pro and DVD studio pro.
Category: III; Production track requirement